On Monday night Zali Steggall held a community forum in Mosman.

We Are Hughes went along to see an independent in action. It was like an alternate universe.

Respect was given to constituents and it was mutually returned. The Q and A session was incredibly informative. Instead of answering all questions herself she deferred expert questions to experts.

Professor Marylouise McLaws, an epidemiologist, answered questions on the vaccine roll out.

The risk benefit analysis of opening borders was addressed, as was the perception of risk benefit to regional areas in comparison to urban areas. Closing of borders is felt more acutely in urban areas where both work and family connections are more often beyond Australia's boundaries. That conversation brought greater understanding to the desire to keep borders closed and the personal and economic desires to open them. Outside emotion and personal wants, the science kept the risk benefit analysis in check.

With the same informed approach, climate change was addressed. Some excellent input from the audience. Questions about nuclear, hydrogen, gas and EVs. There is no question the government's approach to addressing carbon reduction is backward thinking. It's incredibly frustrating hearing not only of the lack of will to reduce emissions but the economic opportunities that are being squandered.

Insights into the workings of Canberra were given. A question about the nature of being an independent was asked. Did Ms Steggall feel she was actually listened to and able to genuinely achieve anything? She answered with zeal, so much so that the audience, a reserved cohort, broke into applause. It was quite a moment.

Meanwhile, in Hughes, our MP reported on the New York Yankees rate of Covid infection.

If we want this sort of respectful, inclusive and informed representation we have to create this change ourselves. Come along Sunday and let's help make positive change a reality. We are the ones that make it happen.

Together let's make our area respectful and constructive. Let's move from embarrassed to proud.

We can do it.